19Sep

Common Expat Concerns After Arriving in Hong Kong

Hong Kong is one of the safest cities for expats. There is also a large expat community providing an easier transition for people who move to the country as singles or with their families.

The biggest adjustment is often the language barrier but on top of that, there are other common concerns felt by expat. InterNations conducted a survey on November 2017 and these were identified as the most common concerns:

SOCIAL CIRCLES

Missing one’s friends is normal. But there is an expansive network of expats whom one can treat as their close support group. There are also numerous interest groups and organizations to join. In addition, social networks and instant messaging has made it easy to stay in touch with people back home. Setting schedules to chat or video call helps make the distance seem smaller.

Business culture with coworkers also falls under this category as Hong Kongers are known to be very serious workers. The most important thing to remember is to remain open and flexible with the local culture because it’s you who needs to adjust. You’ll find that the experience is more pleasant than what you may have initially assumed. One way to initiate social interactions with coworkers is adding them as a professional connection through LinkedIn. This establishes a professional yet approachable means of reaching out to people you work with.

GIVING BIRTH IN HONG KONG

Hong Kong has one of the top medical facilities in the Asia. Having a child is not so much the issue but rather making the choice of giving birth in a public hospital or subscribing to private health care.

Having health insurance that can cover $100,000 or more for prenatal and postnatal care implies checking into a private hospital so you can choose your own obstetrician, have a private room, and get regular check-ups with the same doctor. This is not to say that public healthcare is bad in Hong Kong. In fact, public medical facilities are quite advanced, however, one gains greater control over what happens to you with insurance and private care.

Village Insurance Direct is one of the few companies that help expats find comprehensive health insurance in Hong Kong.

GETTING A NANNY OR DOMESTIC HELPER

Expat parents don’t have to necessarily get a domestic helper or nanny but it is one of the normal practices for dual earning households. Having a nanny to take care of the kids instead of leaving them in a day care is preferred by more expats.

We’ve written a blog which provides useful information on the process and expectations when getting a domestic helper. You can read it here: Expat Guide: Hiring a Domestic Helper in Hong Kong

Note that employers are required to get insurance for domestic helpers. We also provide help in finding cheap insurance for expats.

IS IT WORTH LEARNING MANDARIN/CHINESE?

Taking on the challenge of learning a new language to better communicate with coworkers and new friends is worth the time and effort. Not only will it make life easier but you’ll find that you’ll be more open to exploring other activities outside of your comfort zone.

There are tutors that are available on an hourly basis. One can easily get an online tutor and conduct the lessons online to save the time of going to class. But learning is different for everyone so we recommend trying both to see which works for you.

Need help in finding personal, family, or business insurance? Contact Village Insurance for enquiries.

13Sep

Is C-section the way to go?

In this day and age, Hong Kong stands strong in offering a lot more than tourist attractions and sparkling history. On par with many first-class countries, it prides itself with an excellent healthcare system. For both its residents and expats alike, it has become the place of choice for maternity and childbirth, owing to the structure in its services.

The Hong Kong health system, like many others, is categorized into two: the public and private sectors.

Being a Hong Kong resident with an “identity card” provides you with numerous benefits, including full utilization of their public health system.

Some say that it gets trickier and more complicated when it comes to foreigners, but there’s always no reason to feel lost and left out. Local or not, there’s nothing a good preparation can’t solve.

Adjusting to a childbirth in a foreign country is the first step. As mothers near their delivery, the next logical step is to figure out whether a C-section or classic delivery setup is the way to go.

Crunching the hard digits

In general, the World Health Organization suggests a 10-15% rate in C-section deliveries vis-à-vis a country’s healthcare status.  Since last year, numbers of C-section deliveries have been steadily increasing around the world. Currently, the Dominican Republic holds the top spot with 56.4%. According to this October 2018 research, Hong Kong currently has a Caesarian birth rate of 35%. It stands toe-to-toe with other countries like Turkey and Brazil, who each report rates of over 45%.

The good versus the bad

It is the expectant mother’s choice as to how she wants to have her baby delivered. However, in some cases, it is the doctor’s call whether to perform the surgery or not, particularly when the necessity arises in the situation.

C section deliveries are beneficial for mothers who are unable to bear the stress of the labor process. It is also recommended if more than one baby will be delivered. The procedure helps minimize the risk of having the baby contract a disease from passing through the vaginal area.

However, it also offers a balanced number of downsides. Mothers who opted for the surgical process tend to stay longer in the hospital for recuperation. There is an increased risk of pain or infection following the surgery and soreness is almost guaranteed. Staggering levels of blood loss may also provide low levels of Hemoglobin.

The rates

As an invasive procedure, C-section deliveries generally cost way more than vaginal births. Rates within Hong Kong vary with different hospitals, ranging from standard HK$ 17,000 to pricey lengths such as HK$ 141, 000 for high-tier private hospitals. As of June 2018, for example, the fee for a C-section surgery in St. Paul’s Hospital in Causeway Bay starts at HK$ 18,000 versus their fee for a vaginal birth which starts at HK$ 15, 000.

Ultimately, the choice rests upon the mother’s shoulders. There may be slight differences between private or public hospital settings but one thing remains the same: This is Hong Kong, and both options carry a high standard when it comes to medical care.

Village Insurance Direct provides expats in Hong Kong with health insurance that covers maternity expenses. Contact us for more information.

11Aug

Rainy Season Diseases

Rain is associated with a throng of things, most of which are good.
So, naturally, the rainy season invigorates these good things such as: running in puddles, the pitter-patter of raindrops on the roof that lulls you to sleep, coffees by the windowsill, and for the love-stricken, it’s the ultimate “cuddle weather”.

However, the rainy season brings more than the comfort hot cocoas and oversized sweatshirts.

I hate to be the bearer of bad news but ‘this is also the season for “seasonal” diseases. The quotation marks are there because these diseases are technically always present, however, because the conditions are more favourable in the rainy season, the risk of acquiring them is higher.
Here’s a list of diseases that you need to look out for in the season that keeps on pouring…diseases:

1) Dengue

Dengue is a mosquito-borne, fast-spreading, disease caused by the Flavivirus. It is one of the fastest-spreading diseases at present and, if left untreated, can lead to death.

In the Philippines, out of a total of 77,040 suspected cases, 328 deaths were reported in the first 20 weeks of 2019. Consequently, this makes it an urgent public concern. It is one of the most monitored diseases during the rainy season.

The cases of dengue increase during the rainy season because of the stagnant water that fills up make-shift or incidental “basins” such as pots or bottles which serve as a paradise for the virus-bearing mosquitoes. These areas act as breeding grounds for the mosquitoes. If the area is unkempt or polluted, the happier the mosquitoes.

Further research for the cure for dengue is still underway, and definite
treatment for the diseases is still non-existent. The best way to handle a dengue patient is to bring them to a hospital for supportive care.

The World Health Organization (WHO) encourages early detection, awareness, and preventive measures to fight the spread of the disease. These preventive measures include cleaning the mosquito breeding sites, using mosquito repellents, and nets.

Furthermore, vaccination is encouraged. Aside from dengue, other vector-borne diseases to look out for during the rainy season are Malaria and Yellow fever. However, the incidence of the two is lower than that of Dengue.

2) Leptospirosis

An indirect disease associated with heavy downpour is Leptospirosis which is a bacterial disease caused by the spirochete Leptospira. It can be carried by a variety of animals such as rodents, dogs, livestock, and wildlife however, the poster boy of the disease are sewer rats.

The disease can be acquired when broken skin, just like in cases of lacerations or open wounds, is exposed to water or soil contaminated by the infected animal’s bodily fluids (urine, blood, saliva, etc.). This can also be ingested in cases wherein the water lines in domestic homes are contaminated.

Places, where there is a poor sewage system or sanitation, are prone to flooding. When there’s rain, there’s a flood, and that murky water is a mixture of animal urine and faeces. Hence, people who trudge the flood, especially those with wounds on their legs and feet, are prone to developing the disease.

If untreated, Leptospirosis will cause serious illnesses such as kidney or liver failure, meningitis, difficulty breathing, and bleeding.

Unlike Dengue, antibiotic therapy can be done to fight the disease, but early
detection is vital to the treatment. It is also stressed that prevention can be done by avoiding contact with contaminated water and soil by using appropriate, protective clothing. Prevention of rodent infestation by keeping your area clean is also highly recommended.

Other diseases that we should be vigilant for in cases of flood include typhoid fever, cholera, and hepatitis A.

If you’re travelling anywhere in Asia this rainy season, make sure you have the proper travel insurance cover to keep you protected from emergencies.

 

SOURCES:

https://www.cdc.gov/leptospirosis/exposure/hurricanes-leptospirosis.html

https://www.who.int/westernpacific/news/detail/11-06-2019-dengue-increase-likely-
during-rainy-season-who-warns

https://www.who.int/hac/techguidance/ems/flood_cds/en/

30Jul

Expat Guide: Buying a Used Vehicle in Hong Kong

While there are excellent public transport options in Hong Kong, there are definitely instances where having your own wheels makes life easier.

Here are tips for expats who plan to purchase a used car in Hong Kong:

1. Contact the seller

You might want to ask the following questions that are the most commonly asked in Hong Kong:

“How many previous owners has the car had?”

A car with many owners can be difficult to sell. Bear in mind, if a car has been imported from overseas then the number of previous owners shown will be zero.

“How many kilometres has it done?”

It can be difficult to accumulate kilometres on a car in HK. High-mileage cars are a big deterrent, especially for sporty cars, as these tend to get driven on weekends only.

“What’s the expiry date of the vehicle licence (registration)?”

Registration in Hong Kong is valid for one year. The fee is based on the engine size. Cars that are seven years or older will need a roadworthiness inspection (MOT) by a government-appointed garage within four months of renewing the vehicle licence.

If you’re happy after the initial Q&A, the next step is to meet with the owner. We suggest viewing the car during the day. Have a thorough look at the exterior and interior of the car, and at any maintenance history and receipts the owner may have. It’s rare to find cars with a full history, and the common story is that the missing records were “lost”. Most owners will be hesitant to allow you to test drive a car; instead, they’ll offer a “test ride” where you sit in the passenger’s seat for a drive.

2. Agree to a deal

If you’re happy with the condition of the car and ready to make a deal, what price should you offer? As with most things in Hong Kong, negotiation is common; it’s not unreasonable to offer 20% below the asking price. Once you both agree to a price, a five% deposit should secure your commitment. We strongly recommend you arrange an inspection; these range from HK$500 to $2,500 and can save you a lot of money and grief in the future.

3. Arrange insurance

Hong Kong requires a minimum of third-party insurance for a vehicle. Arranging insurance is quick and easy, and typically cheaper than in other countries. Note: Before committing to a car, make sure you are eligible for insurance. Certain car models require a minimum age and a No Claims Bonus (NCB) percentage. Village Insurance Direct helps expats find Motor Insurance that’s affordable and comprehensive.

4. Finalise the transfer of ownership

The final stage is to visit the Transport Department with the following required documents: insurance cover note, HKID, proof of address (within the past three months), and form TD25 to be completed and signed by both parties, along with a HK$1,000 transfer fee (at the buyer’s expense). The owner will sign form TD25 once they have received the remaining balance for the car. This can be done by cash, cheque or bank cashier order at the seller’s request

15Jun

Expat Tips: Getting Around Hong Kong

Some things never change. Hong Kong, for instance, is still a metro titan. At its heart is a booming commercial identity that’s the product of a strategic location. It has aged like fine wine through the years and has been fine-tuned to operate for centuries. One cannot discount how its location and routes easily contributed to its transformation as a central hub of Asia. When people say you can travel anywhere from Hong Kong, they mean every word of it.

Here we break down how travel can easily be achieved from Hong Kong to Mainland China through various forms of transport.

Ferries

The ocean has always been the classical route to this city. Even to this day, Hong Kong isn’t short of ferries and boats that could take you just about anywhere. Mainland China is easily connected to Hong Kong through several ports. One can take advantage of ferries from different points such as Kowloon, Hong Kong Island, and even from Hong Kong International Airport.

Turbojet is a popular choice among travellers. It offers 24-hour-transport services that take about 45 minutes for the whole trip. Other options include the Hong Kong-Macau Ferry Terminal, Chu Kong Passenger Transport, and the Shun Tak Centre Hong Kong.

Turbojet has ferry services from Hong Kong and Macau that take about an hour from Kowloon. From the same terminal, Chu Kong Passenger Transport also provides transport between Hing Kong and several cities in the Guangdong province and other areas such as the Zhongshan, Humen, and Zhuhai. Passengers coming in through the Hong Kong International Airport on their way to the Pearl River Delta area have the option to make use of the SkyPier ferry services instead.

Air Travel

It’s easy to travel from the Hong Kong International Airport to any international destination. Almost all carriers that are docked there cater to almost all countries. It is also home to several budget airlines such as AirAsia and Hong Kong Airlines, which are good options for flights within Asia. Just be sure to ready for your passport and other documents such as visas and/or your Hong Kong ID card.

Trains

Another option for transport would be the use of trains. From Hong Kong, trains move to China straight through Shenzen and Guangzhou. There will be short stops along the way like in Dongguan. There are also trains available to other specific areas such as Beijing and Shanghai.

Buses/coaches

If trains or ferries aren’t for you, then taking the long road might be the answer. From Hong Kong, there are buses (or coaches) available that cross the border to Guangdong Province (and its cities).

To a lot of people, which makes Hong Kong special is its ability to self-sustain as a business hub. Most of the time, however, people often miss how it is made beautiful by its ability to connect nations even to this day. For example, these are only lists of how Hong Kong can easily link up with mainland China. The routes to all other destinations are plenty and thriving. This only goes to show that Hong Kong is easily one of Asia’s greatest hubs that are here to stay.

For personal and business insurance in Hong Kong, get in touch with us. We help find the best policies for expats.

20Apr

The Expat life: Hong Kong Edition

Welcome to expat life.

Life in a new city can feel overwhelming. New people, a new language, new work, and new routines.

Being an expatriate has its own sets of pros and cons. A move to a country like Hong Kong isn’t a full turn from life in the west since it’s one of Asia’s top destinations for expats from the UK and the US. It’s a melting pot of different cultures and it’s one of the most preferred places to establish businesses.

Expat life in Hong Kong parallels no other, an experience that’s exclusive to itself.

Whatever city you’re in, the first step is to brace yourself with changes. It’s good to anticipate that there will be a few ups and downs along the course of your transition. Cut yourself some slack.

The expat community in Asian counties is continuously growing. If you need a hand in learning the ropes, there’s nothing wrong with asking for help. It will also be your stepping stone in exploring the urban jungle you’re in.

Want to settle in a place with familiar faces? That’s certainly not a problem. Hong Kong, for example, cradles a lot of its expats in the West Kowloon area. Aside from fellow expats, it is home to a lot of amenities that would easily cater to your comfort.

The Expat Community

Expat communities in Hong Kong range from the outgoing to the insular and close-knit. British and Americans compose mainly form the bulk of the community and they often work in the financial sector. Foreigners from neighbouring East Asia countries are also prominent in the country mostly from Japan, Indonesia, Philippines, India and Thailand.

What Language to Learn

Foreigners with good language skills in both Cantonese and Mandarin are going to have a significant advantage. 89.5% of the whole population speaks Cantonese. We recommend you try to at least learn some basic conversational Cantonese.

Housing and Other Accommodations

Hong Kong is known for having one of the most expensive property prices in Asia and even the world. Expect compact condos and apartments with high rent although there are still areas with more affordable housing.

We gathered the average rent for 2 bedroom apartments popular to expat communities in one of our blogs: Finding a Place to Live in Hong Kong

In the end, there’s really no clear-cut guide on how to ease yourself into the expat life. Change takes time and effort. Don’t let the city intimidate you. Sit back and explore your new home. Everything new is just within the tip of your fingertips.

For expats looking to find the best personal or business insurance, get in touch with Village Insurance Direct today. We help find the best policies for expats.

21Feb

Traveling Tips: Hokkaido

When in Japan, the two go-to choices of travelers always revolve around the cities of Tokyo and Osaka. A third option exists to advanced travelers. When you’re just about satisfied with your thirst for urban scenery and deep-rooted culture, you are now welcome to enter the snowy plains of Hokkaido.

Planning a trip to Hokkaido offers an extra challenge to all travelers. It simply isn’t easy because there’s just too much to explore. This is why there will be two parts to planning your travel: the pre-trip checklist, and your actual guide once you’ve reached your destination.

Before the flurry

It’s a fact we have to face. It’s hard to be away from home these days without internet connection. Quite honestly, having no internet connectivity while traveling In Japan will be a nightmare. From translations to map-checking, things will be more complicated. The choice is yours if you want opt for a sim card (for solo travelers) or a standard 4G pocket wifi (suited for group travels).

An efficient public transport is what drives Japan in general. Before heading to Hokkaido, get a reloadable IC card that could be used on all public transport like JR trains, and buses. Pre-purchased IC cards from other regions like Tokyo and Osaka can also be used.

Sapporo TV tower

A famous landmark in the area, this tall structure offers a beautiful view of Odori park. It is the second tallest tower in Japan after the Tokyo Tower.

They charge an entrance fee of 720 yen. Third party services such as Klook offer tickets for a relatively lower price.

Otaru Canal

Beautifully restored and a favorite tourist spot, the Otaru Canal is a sight of beauty, better at nighttime. The place is a serene body of water lit by 63 gas lamps along its promenade. If you travel during the winter period, you get to see the stone houses buried in snow, giving an appeal that reminds you of the western places.

Mt. Hakodate

Standing at 334 meters high, Mount Hakodate is a wooded mountain at the southern end of the area. For cheaper expenses, this perfect spot offers a view of the city from a high vantage point. The facilities are accessible through your choice of a 10-minute ropeway, or through a bus. They charge a fee of 1280 yen for a roundtrip ropeway and 780 yen for a single trip.

Shirugane Blue Pond

We live for beautiful turquoise waters and a sense of peace. This place is a must-visit if you’re after wintry sceneries. During the cold season, the area transforms into a magical view as it gets engulfed by artistic lighting patterns. Even without the light shows, its beautiful waters are enough to surely steal your heart.

Furano Flower Fields

Maybe it’s time to give Sunflower a break. Being in Hokkaido provides a fresh opportunity to fall in love with lavender, which has been cultivated in the area for more than half a century. Furano’s flower fields are lavender heavens which always have a lot of visitors in summer, when everything is in full bloom.

Still uncomfortable being outside your comfort zone? Overestimate your calculated expenses, particularly when you’re planning to go on a budget trip. Pull the extra strings on safety by securing travel insurance which will provide you security from the smallest hassle to the biggest of inconveniences. The snowy plains of Hokkaido will be waiting for your you, but there’s nothing wrong with a little extra precaution. Be it your first time or your 20th, it’s always best to be at ease and not worrying about anything.

7Feb

Travelling in Southeast Asia

Southeast Asia is easily one of the world’s well-loved and well-trodden tourist destinations worldwide, and, if you’ve visited any of its countries, it’s easy to see the reason behind its appeal.

“Diverse” is the best word to describe Southeast Asian countries. It is already known that the culture in these countries tend to be kaleidoscopic—it takes different colors and figures to make it what it is. This is from the people to the culture. However, what people seldom realize is there is diversity also exist in the activities that they offer.

Are you itching for some adrenaline and want to go to forest or ocean adventures? Is your mouth craving for a food trip? Want to look smart in front of your friends by the end of the summer by going to a cultural or history tour? Want to cap off your trip by spending the day shopping or exploring the night life of a roaring city that never sleeps? (That’s right, New York. You’re not the only insomniac’s paradise anymore.)

All of this can be done in Southeast Asia.

So, if you’re considering Southeast Asia as your next travel destination (and it would be unwise not to), here are some of the must-go, absolutely necessary places to visit depending on what the over-all theme of how you want your vacation to be, along with tips in travelling when there:

Adrenaline rushers

Palawan of the Philippines is one of the most popular go-to destinations for people who are willing to dip their toes into the wild side. From parasailing, to trekking, to canoeing in a cave, to snorkelling, to full-on scuba-diving, the island of Palawan has it all. The island’s diverse marine life is one the reasons why it is continuously revisited by tourists and even locals. It would be a sin not to explore its waters when there. Prepare some cash, though, almost everything comes with a price there but, rest assured, you’ll get your money’s worth.

Other islands in the Philippines that’s slowly gaining popularity is Cebu. The biggest hassle though is the travelling in the island itself. The go-to places tend to be far apart and transportation is a bit difficult to come by, however there are cab drivers that offer their services.

Other things to explore in Southeast Asia:

  • Surfing in Bali
  • Off-road motorbike tour in Laos- this would be more fun if you know how to ride a motorbike on your own
  • Sky-diving in Pataya, Thailand
  • Spelunking in Vietnam
  • Climbing Mount Pulag, Philippines

#Cultured

Southeast Asia is layered with so much history that in any country that you choose, their historical and culture tours would not disappoint. However, here are some of the note-worthy activities:

  • Temple-hopping

One of the most marvelled temples in Southeast Asia is Cambodia’s Angkor Wat Temple. Considered as one of the Seven Wonders of the World, it’s magnificent and intricate design has won the hearts of many tourist and architecture enthusiast

Other temples are:

  • Hue in Vietnam
    • Candi Prambanan and Borobudur in Indonesia
    • The temples in Laos
  • Japan Culture tour

The culture of Japan captured the hearts of many people that is has reached the western countries. If you’re interested in diving deeper, you can arrange for a culture tour wherein you can:

visit Asakusa, Meiji Shrine, Imperial Palace 

explore Gion, and visit a Kimono craftsman workshop, wear an actual kimono, and experience an authentic tea and incense ceremony. You can also opt to have full-course kaiseki dinner, complete with Geisha performance.

Just want to be fat and happy

Singapore is the first place that comes to mind when somebody says, “Food trip!”

Sure, Thai and Japanese food are great, but nothing compares to the hawker stalls in Singapore. Although the city is known for being “fine” because everything there seems to be expensive and comes with a hefty “fine”, the street foods are actually cheap when taking into consideration their quality and serving. Remember that scene from “Crazy, Rich, Asians”? Made your mouth water, didn’t it?

One can map an entire tour, just based solely on your craving. And since the city is quite small, you can burn calories and guilt that came with what you just ate by walking to the next restaurant. You probably won’t, but at least the options there.

From adrenaline junkies to wannabe “cultured snobs”, Southeast Asia is ready to cater to everyone and anyone. All you have to do is do your research and know where to look.

NEED TRAVEL INSURANCE THAT COVERS YOUR TRAVEL THROUGHOUT SOUTHEAST ASIA? We help expats find the best travel insurance. Get in touch with us.

17Jan

Expat Life: Where to Live in Hong Kong in 2019

The peak of every Hong Kong experience lies in the belly of the beast: in the city itself. But when the day ends, it is best to know the perfect place to settle in.

Hong Kong never falls short of choices when it comes to areas of living. There will be a lot of deciding factors that may either make or break you when it’s time to choose. Budget always comes first, and then the level of comfort that crosses with the number of residents that will stay with you.

Kowloon Tong & West Kowloon

Photo from squarefoot.com.hk

The best place when it comes to families would probably be Kowloon Tong and West Kowloon. They are excellent for expats thanks for the accessible transports that lead to the city’s center. It is also home to different international schools, which would be great if children will be living there too.

Mid Levels

Photo from Engel & Völkers

This is the best choice for someone who highlights leisure as the main component of their stay as expats. The Mid Levels offers excellent routes and access to Soho and Lan Kwai Fong, which are basically areas filled with engagement and nightlife. Like Kowloon Tong, there are also schools nearby.

North Point

Photo from EJ Insights

North Point, by far, is the best choice for expats looking for an expanding community. This is a hidden gem, as most people prefer other areas that are closer to spots of leisure and nightlife. Immersive with Hong Kong spirit, there are a good number of traditional markets and restaurants.

The Peak

Photo from tripleytravelandtours.com

Its name holds what it offers best. The Peak is a scenic place to live in and that’s a given fact. Known to many as an affluent area in Hong Kong, it is impossible to miss as a good choice to live in for expats. The high area is home to various amenities for its residents such as swimming pools and tennis courts. It’s almost as if you never left your house in the West.

Repulse Bay & Stanley

Photo from Saville HK

The lack of easy access to an MTR line is perhaps the only foreseeable setback from living in this area. Other than that, everything else is a win. Between the two areas, Stanley is a more affordable choice. Nonetheless, both areas offer excellent facilities including a number of banks, shops, and restaurants. It is the choice for those who dream of living closer to the beach. Who knows, this might be the best choice for you.

Happy Valley/Jardine’s Lookout

Photo from Savills HK

These two areas provide the best range for people who are still looking for the best place to live as it offers a vast type of accommodation. The choice is at your fingertips: Be it a simple apartment to luxurious townhouses. Happy Valley is also a growing community as a lot of expats have chosen to live there as well. Jardine’s Lookout offers a magnificent view as it is higher up the mountain. It offers a sense of exclusivity with its various facilities.

Wan Chai

Photo from Discover Hong Kong

Last on the list brings this article to a full circle. If you want to live in the heart of Hong Kong, then Wan Chai may just be the place for you. This area is located in the central part of Hong Kong and is jam-packed with amenities that are maxed out for your purpose. There are plenty of restaurants, shops, and hotels and every other form of entertainment that’s meant for you.

For help on property insurance or renter’s insurance, get in touch with Village Insurance Direct today. We help expats find the best covers for your needs.