13Jun

Types of Medical Charges for Hong Kong Residents

There are three types of charges in Hong Kong hospitals based on whether it is for public or private health care. Your status as a resident is also a factor for the fees you should expect for medical services from hospitals.

You are required to have an Identification Card when living for an extended period of time in the country. This card entitles you to access the country’s public health facilities among other government services. Hospitals will determine the amount of fees and charges to issue patients based on two categories: (1) Eligible and (2) Non-eligible.

To be considered Eligible you should be:

  • Holders of Hong Kong Identification Card issued under the Registration of Persons Ordinance, except those who obtained their Hong Kong Identity Card by virtue of a previous permission to land or remain in Hong Kong granted to them and such permission has expired or ceased to be valid;
  • Children who are Hong Kong residents and under 11 years of age; or
  • Other persons approved by the Chief Executive of the Hospital Authority.

Any expat or resident that do not fulfill the abovementioned requirements are automatically considered Non-eligible.

Hospital fees and charges under public and private healthcare facilities will also depend on your eligibility. There are three types of charges in Hong Kong hospitals.

The rates below are based from information from the Hospital Authority.

Public Charge for Eligible Persons
Service Fees
Accident & Emergency $100 per attendance
In-patient (general acute beds) $50 admission fee, plus $100 per day
In-patient (convalescent, rehabilitation, infirmary & psychiatric beds) $68 per day
Specialist out-patient (including allied health services) $100 for the 1st attendance, $60 per subsequent attendance, $10 per drug item
General out-patient $45 per attendance
Geriatric, Psychiatric & Rehabilitation day hospital $55 per attendance

 

Public Charge for Non-eligible Persons
Service Fees
Accident & Emergency $990 per attendance
In-patient (general hospitals) $4,680 per day 
In-patient (psychiatric hospitals) $1,940 per day 
Intensive care ward/unit $23,000 per day
High dependency ward/unit $12,000 per day
Nursery $1,110 per day
      Obstetric care $39,000 – $90,000 (1-2 nights)
Specialist out-patient (including allied health services) $1,110 per attendance
Day procedure and treatment at Clinical Oncology Clinic $800 per attendance
General out-patient $385 per attendance

Here is a list of public hospitals in Hong Kong.

Private Charges
Service Fees
In-patient (acute hospitals)

  • 1st class
  • 2nd class
  • $5,640 per day 
  • $3,760 per day 
In-patient (other hospitals)

  • 1st class
  • 2nd class
  • $5,610 per day 
  • $3,740 per day 
Intensive care ward/unit $14,600 per day 
Nursery $925 per day 
In-patient consultation (per specialty) $680 – $2,780 per visit
Out-patient consultation (per specialty)

  • Initial consultation
  • Subsequent follow up consultation
  • $680 – $2,160 per attendance
  • $555 – $1,420 per attendance

Here is a list of private hospitals in Hong Kong.

As one you can see health care is expensive in Hong Kong. This is why we at Village Insurance Direct recommend expats to get Health Insurance for more comprehensive care from a private health facility, minus the worry of soaring fees and charges. While public hospitals are equipped to manage numerous emergency situations having that peace of mind at times of unforeseen circumstances is one you must aim for when in a foreign country. This is especially a concern for expats with families.

5Jun

Backpacking Tips when Travelling in Southeast Asia

Backpacking in Southeast Asia (SEA) can very well turn out be one of the best trips in someone’s life if planned properly. Like in any trip, it is important to get to know your destinations before embarking on them. As amazing as the countries are in this corner of the world with its tropical forests, flamboyant environmental richness and diversity, and deeply seeded cultures, rookie mistakes can lead to very disastrous results. So, here are few things to take into account if you’re planning on travelling to a SEA country or backpacking across it.

Travel Insurance

It is always recommended to have a travel insurance, especially in long trips to foreign countries lasting from weeks to months.

Some parts of Southeast Asia are high risk for foreigners and expats. It’s always better to anticipate the worst case scenario when traveling to unfamiliar territories.

Do your research and look for a travel insurance that covers loss of items, missed or cancelled flights and trips, and, most importantly, any medical conditions that can be encountered. Plus, make sure to purchase one that is covered in the countries that you plan to visit.

Vaccinations

As said earlier, Southeast Asian countries are not just hotpots for culture but, unfortunately, for infectious diseases as well. Malaria, dengue, tetanus, hepatitis A, and typhoid are only some of the serious diseases that’s common in most of the 11 states. Acquiring the disease can lead to serious complications and even death.

“Prevention is always better than cure.” Before going on a backpacking trip, consider the diseases common in the locality that you’re going to or even just pass by, take into account the season and which diseases are more common in that season (i.e. high incidence of dengue in the Philippines during the rainy season). Vaccination should start months prior to your trip make ensure completion.

Other infectious diseases that do not have vaccinations but have post-exposure prophylaxis such as rabies or HIV should be covered by your travel insurance.

Apps

Technology has changed the way that people travel. Here are some of the essential apps when travelling Southeast Asia:

  1. “XE currency” and other currency converters, preferably one that works even offline is a must for travellers.
  2. “Google Maps” and “MAPS.me” are some of the recommended map apps by travellers.
  3. “Google translate” can be both your friend and enemy when travelling. Sometimes translations are inaccurate due to local idioms or figures of speech. Learning the local’s language wouldn’t hurt and the best app for that is “Duolingo.”
  4. Ride-sharing or hailing apps available in the region
  5. “Traveloka” and other flight and hotel booking apps for stress-free reservations.
  6. “Food Panda” if you’re not feeling like eating out or you miss fast food, this is the delivery app to go to.
  7. “Trail wallet” is a budget tracking app being that your financial resources are most likely limited during travel

Planning ahead, learning about the place you’re going to, and being smart with your decisions are the keys to a safe and hassle-free travel.