How to Rent Property in Hong Kong


If you’re looking to rent property in Hong Kong, here are some guidelines to help smoothen the process.


First things first, you need to assess the market and find out what you can afford. Research what is available for your budget and two to four weeks before moving in, you’ll need to start an actual visit to these properties. Once you’re at the physical checking stage, it’s best to hire an agent who you can work with and who can show you the properties with the details you’re looking for.


If you’ve found some properties that interest you, it’s time to ask a lot of important questions that will aid in narrowing down your choices. You’ll need to find out who the landlord is and make sure this person is someone you can get along with since you’ll be dealing with them for the duration of your stay. Ask how long the property has been on the market and if it’s been a few months, find out why. If it’s under a mortgage, you’ll need your agent to secure a Mortgagee Consent and this may affect your move-in date. And of course, you have to inspect every inch of the property. Make sure utilities are in good working condition, there’s no mold on the walls, electrical outlets are safe, lights are working, and that the entire place is generally safe to live in. Once you’re living there and you find something wrong, you’ll regret you weren’t more thorough.


Once you’ve decided on a property that has what you’re looking for, it’s time to make an offer to your agent then you will receive a provisional rental agreement. Rent, lease terms (including handover and move-in date), break clause, and maintenance works are open to discussion. Speak with the landlord and set realistic deadlines on anything they have to fix. It’s important to establish a great relationship with your landlord from the get-go to live happily in your new place.

The provisional rental agreement must be signed first and then the tenancy agreement. Review these careful as they are legally binding documents. Your agent can help you with this or if it’s too complicated, you can hire a solicitor. After you’ve signed the provisional rental agreement, you’ll need to give a deposit worth two month’s rent. Then the tenancy agreement comes next which includes stamp duty which you can split halfway with the landlord.

Once you get the keys to the place, it’s important to run one last inspection and document everything. Take photos of the property and keep them as records. Check any work that was done and document scratches, chips, or any kind of marks to prove they were there before you moved in, the number of keys, remote controls, and the gas and water metres. Your agent should make sure that all additional work you requested from your landlord should be completed at this point, the property should be clean and ready for you to reside in, and utility accounts are connected.

If you follow these steps, finding the right place to live in will come easily and you’ll find yourself enjoying your new place for as long as you’re there.

We recommend getting Renter’s Insurance to protect your possessions inside your apartment.


Mental Health for Expats: Reducing Stress & Anxiety After Moving

The importance of paying attention to one’s mental health is now more crucial than ever. Expats in particular deal with different forms of stress and anxiety. Research has shown that a major life transition such as geographically moving from one’s native country to a different one is one of the top causes of stress and anxiety–along with death of family and divorce.

Expats deal with moving from one location to another every 3 to 4 years and this is on top of adjusting to a new job, new people, and culture. The lack of a stable support system such as one’s usual friends and family makes it all the more challenging to manage the mental and emotional tolls from such situations.

What’s the difference between stress and anxiety?

Stress comes in anticipation of a threat. It’s a physiological response. Excessive adrenaline is produced by the body, our heart rate increases and muscles become tensed. Prolonged exposure to stress can lead to hypertension and high blood pressure and for expats, the source is more often emotional and psychological.

Identifying the trigger is easier when we feel stress but catch it early. When we feel anxiety, there is usually no trigger we can identify. We just know we are worried, uncomfortable, and preoccupied with our thoughts. This is the difference between stress and anxiety.

Dealing with stress…

Evaluate your physical condition. Are your shoulders tensed? Is your breathing shallow? These are physical manifestations of stress. To help you slow your breathing, try these techniques:

Take 10 deep breaths, inhaling through your nose and exhaling out your mouth. Your belly should expand with every inhale. Focus on your breathing and you should feel your mind slowing down after the 10th exhale.

You can also try deep breathing while clutching a pillow on your chest. Squeeze as tightly as you can when you breath in. Release and breath out.

Running to release tension is also an alternative if you are looking for a high impact activity.

These simple techniques are not the sole solutions but they will help you manage yourself better more quickly.

What about anxiety?

The unknown is the most probable cause of anxiety among expats. It’s a lingering feeling of restlessness or nervousness. In order to start dealing with the situation, it is important to acknowledge the thoughts that continue to bother us. Let these thoughts pass by our minds, and let them go.

Letting go of the thoughts does not equate to inaction but it will help you have have a clearer perspective on which decisions are more important and which ones are merely thoughts.

If no changes are felt or noticed, seek the help of a mental health professional. Here is a list of private psychiatrists in Hong Kong.

Check your health insurance plan if they cover therapy and maintenance drugs. You can also choose to upgrade your existing medical insurance to cover your needs. Contact us to learn more about insurance for expats in Hong Kong.


Do I Need Life Insurance After Retirement?

Retirement does not always equate to having financial stability. A few possible circumstances that leaves you in this kind of situation are:

Forced retirement

Failed investments

Providing financial support for an aging family member or children who are still living at home

If you find yourself in debt or  responsible for someone’s well-being, then the short answer to the question is, “YES” you need life insurance even after retirement.


It’s important to evaluate where you stand financially upon retirement. How much are your monthly expenses? Are there federal or state taxes that need to be paid? There are also things like probate costs, administration costs; there might be final debt or a mortgage on house, too. So as long as there is some type of financial exposure, you need life insurance to match up with that.


Yes. Of course, premiums will be higher which is why it’s advisable to get life insurance cover as early as your 20s or 30s. The greatest value of life insurance after retirement is that surviving family members or your spouse is left with financial security after the insurance holder’s death.


Other benefits is that you can use the sum to help you pay for medical expenses–this is if you feel that you will no longer need the death benefit. This is called the accelerated death benefit provision. You have the option of choosing permanent life insurance to have money safely tucked away with zero risks.

You may also need to think about getting health insurance since more seniors are prone to health complications–thus more spend on medical needs. Although Hong Kong has a wonderful healthcare system, retirement will most likely lead to more trips to the hospital and getting more prescription drugs to maintain your health.

Ask us about more details on life insurance or health insurance or email us at info@villageinsruancedirect.com.